The Lessons We Can Learn from Our Country’s Cuban Refugee Policy

The policy of “wet foot, dry foot” that President Obama ended late this week was a variation of the special status provided to Cubans fleeing that nation by every president since Dwight D. Eisenhower. Along with the Cuban Adjustment Act of 1966, these policies gave millions of Cubans a head start on legal permanent residence and a path to U.S. citizenship.

By any and every measure, those who fled Castro’s Cuba–as well as their descendants–have made enormous contributions to this country. Through hard work and entrepreneurial spirit, Cuban Americans revitalized South Florida, helping transform what had been a struggling region into a dynamic bridge to Latin America. And Cuban Americans have made their mark at the highest echelons of business, the arts, sports, education, and government.

Cuban Americans, later joined by numerous other Latino subgroups, have also given us a glimpse into our nation’s future. While the process of demographic change is never easy, they’ve demonstrated that increased diversity need not be a zero-sum game, that the advancement of one group can be part of a rising tide lifting all boats. In that sense, the generosity extended to those fleeing the Castro regime has served our country as well.

At the same time, far too often our nation has failed to extend this generosity to other similarly situated groups, such as Haitians fleeing corrupt and dictatorial regimes and natural disasters, or Central Americans leaving countries wrecked by civil war, political persecution, and extreme violence. While it is true that our country cannot accept everyone seeking to enter from abroad, it is also true that we should always pursue the highest degree of fairness possible.

Most Americans would agree that no one seeking to become an “American by choice”–whether as a refugee fleeing persecution, a legal immigrant reuniting with family members, or an undocumented immigrant brought to the United States as a child–should be excluded from this precious opportunity based on their race, religion, or country of origin. If that is true, the converse is also true–that certain newcomers should not be given easier access solely due to these characteristics.

We would have much preferred that this administration, and its predecessors for that matter, would have afforded greater generosity to all groups fleeing political persecution, civil war, and extreme violence instead of closing off avenues for Cubans.

As a new administration that has expressed hostility to immigrants is poised to begin, we hope it recognizes two clear lessons from the more than five decades of generosity our country has shown to Cubans. First, the wise exercise of presidential discretion in immigration–initiated by President Eisenhower with Cubans–can result in enormous benefits to all Americans.
 
Second, the dire predictions that Cuban refugees–or DREAMers or any other group of immigrants–threatened our nation’s economy, security, or values have been proven false, again and again. The next administration would do well to heed those lessons as it considers its own options.

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Undocumented Immigrants Tell Trump They’re Not Going Back Into The Shadows

WASHINGTON ― Undocumented immigrants and their allies gathered across the U.S. on Saturday to tell President-elect Donald Trump they won’t be driven out or silenced when he takes office.

In Washington, where Trump will be sworn in as president in six days, people piled out of buses from as far as New York and North Carolina, and crammed into the pews of a historically black church several blocks north of the White House.

About 1,900 people made it inside the Metropolitan AME Church, and another 300 marched around the block in the cold drizzle, according to estimates from organizers.

“Are we going back into the shadows?” Cristina Jimenez of United We Dream, one of the advocacy groups that organized the event, asked the crowd inside. “No!” they screamed in response.

The event was part of a day of action for immigrants rights that included more than 70 such rallies and meetings nationwide. Some took place outside detention centers, like the one in Broward County, Florida, where undocumented immigrants facing deportation were held inside. Others gathered in restaurants or community centers, where advocates strategized how to protect undocumented communities under Trump. Some were large rallies, like the one in Los Angeles.

They all were intended to show resistance to Trump’s promises to expand “deportation forces” aimed at driving out undocumented immigrants, stripping young people of protections, rejecting refugees, banning Muslims from the country, and building a wall on the Mexico border that could impede not just those coming to the U.S. to work, but also those seeking asylum.

I hear them, you hear them and we’re going to make sure that Donald Trump hears them.
Rep. Luis Gutiérrez (D-Ill.) on young undocumented immigrants

The protests showed it isn’t solely immigrant communities that will fight back, but also other allies, including other people of color, labor organizations and LGBTQ rights groups. The event was organized by a large coalition of groups: CASA de Maryland, United We Dream, the Center for Community Change/Fair Immigration Reform Movement and the Service Employees International Union. 

“This is your home,”  Metropolitan AME Pastor William H. Lamar IV said while welcoming attendees to the church. “Together we will fight to ensure that the justice that God intends for all of us is enjoyed by all of us.”

Planned Parenthood CEO Cecile Richards spoke about the need to fight to protect health care and reproductive rights for people of color and immigrants. “We stand with you and now is the time to link arms in this country and join the fight,” she said.

Rep. Luis Gutiérrez (D-Ill.), a leader in Congress in the fight for immigration reform, tied immigrant rights to the effort for fair wages, and for justice for women and all people of color.

Gutiérrez compared recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, and other so-called Dreamers who came to the U.S. as children to “freedom fighters.” He is one of several lawmakers ― Democrats and Republicans ― pushing for a bill called the Bridge Act to extend DACA protections, should Trump follow through on his promise to yank protections from more than 750,000 young people.

“We’re building a bridge,” Gutiérrez said. “750,000 young people walk across that bridge, and every time one of them walks across that bridge, they strengthen the bridge.”

They will lead the way to reform that helps all 11 million undocumented immigrants, Gutiérrez said.

“I hear them, you hear them,” he said, “and we’re going to make sure that Donald Trump hears them.”

More images and videos from events around the country:

Strong allies in Congress and our communities. @CecileRichards w/ @ChrisVanHollen @RepMcGovern @JMurguia_NCLR & @MaryKayHenry #HeretoStay pic.twitter.com/Z9f6cdHFPB

— Planned Parenthood (@PPact) January 14, 2017

.@RepJudyChu "they r feeling the heat & they know they'll look terrible if they deport immigrants. We have to keep up the heat! #HereToStay pic.twitter.com/AFE2j1BSIt

— iAmerica (@iAmericaorg) January 14, 2017

HAPPENING NOW! Thousands marching towards the White House.

DACA, immigrants, and refugees are #HereToStay pic.twitter.com/cYOfE8HGuC

— United We Dream (@UNITEDWEDREAM) January 14, 2017

Planned Parenthood stands with immigrants and refugees. #WeWillResist pic.twitter.com/21Cvo91ArW

— Planned Parenthood (@PPIAction) January 14, 2017

Faith leaders, community members across Chicago are here to fight for justice and respect! @CommsUnited @icirr #HereToStay #WeWillResist pic.twitter.com/QsI9b8IrDn

— Jessica Estrada (@jessEstradaAP) January 14, 2017

.@sierraclub at #HeretoStay in San Jose California pic.twitter.com/SstEWEY6su

— Nicole Ghio (@nicoleghio) January 14, 2017

Sierra Club Florida stands today with all those targeted by the Trump Admin. #HereToStay @sierraclub rally in Pompano Beach, FL pic.twitter.com/cECedlY16h

— Sierra Club Florida (@SierraClubFL) January 14, 2017

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Zoe Saldana Thinks Hollywood ‘Bullies’ Won Trump The White House

Zoe Saldana found herself in hot water on Saturday after claiming Hollywood’s “bullying” tactics emboldened the electorate into voting for Donald Trump.

“We got cocky and became arrogant and we also became bullies,” Saldana said in an interview with AFP of Trump ― who has been repeatedly accused of bullying reporters, political opponents, minority groups, not to mention dodging allegations of sexual assault throughout his campaign. 

“We were trying to single out a man for all these things he was doing wrong,” she continued, “and that created empathy in a big group of people in America that felt bad for him and that are believing in his promises.”

Saldana has gone on the record as a supporter of Trump’s Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton, and she has previously been vocal about her distaste for the president-elect’s proposed policies, especially when it comes to immigration. In February, she co-signed a letter with actress America Ferrara and other Latinos in Hollywood to stand up against Trump’s “anti-immigrant fear-mongering.” Months before the election, she also endorsed a letter signed by the “Star Trek” cast that described him as “an amateur with a contemptuous ignorance of national laws and international realities.”

“I’m learning from [Trump’s victory] with a lot of humility,” Saldana said. “If we have people continue to be strong and educate ourselves and stand by equal rights and treat everyone with respect, we won’t go back to those times.”

Her comments come after a week of high-profile actresses addressing Trump publicly. At the 74th Annual Golden Globes on Sunday, Meryl Streep delivered an impassioned speech about how we all must help “safeguard the truth” and challenge Trump’s attack on the press, foreigners and the entertainment industry. Days later, Nicole Kidman caused some controversy by declaring that it’s time all Americans “support” the future president now that he’s been elected. 

Watch Saldana respond to Streep’s speech in the video below: 

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Artist Turns Donald Trump’s Most Controversial Quotes Into Comic Book Covers

An artist is giving President-elect Donald Trump’s most outrageous comments the comic book treatment.

Cartoonist Robert Sikoryak is transforming several of the controversial and offensive statements that Trump made during the presidential election campaign into eye-catching and thought-provoking illustrations.

“The idea occurred to me right before the election,” the New York City-based artist told The Huffington Post on Saturday.  Trump had said so many outrageous things during his campaign that I wanted to catalogue them.”

“It was important to me to only use Trump’s actual quotes, I didn’t want to put any words in his mouth,” he added. “Once Trump became the president-elect, I felt I had to do it.”

Sikoryak’s work has previously appeared on the cover pages of The New Yorker magazine and the Harvard Business Review. He has also transformed Apple’s iTunes terms of service into comic parodies.

For this project, titled “The Unquotable Trump,” he has compiled the images into a mini-comic. He’s also posting them on a dedicated Tumblr page.

“The reaction has been very enthusiastic, much more so than I expected,” Sikoryak told HuffPost. “I needed to get these comics out of my system, so it’s gratifying that other people have been enjoying them.”

Check out more of his Trump-themed comic book covers below and see his other work via his website, Facebook, Tumblr and Twitter accounts.

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Cubans Stranded On Mexican Border After Obama’s 11th-Hour Change

NUEVO LAREDO, Mexico ― Yuri Rodríguez had his paperwork filled out, his fingerprints scanned and a preliminary interview with immigration officials completed. The only thing left to do was to wait in line until he and another group of Cubans were allowed to enter the United States under a five-decade-old policy that gave preferential treatment to migrants from the communist island.

“When I tried crossing yesterday morning, the law still applied,” Rodríguez, 41, told HuffPost.  “Everything was ready.” 

But by around 4 p.m., something was wrong. When official word came down that the Obama administration was scrapping the so-called wet foot-dry foot policy that allowed Cuban migrants, Rodríguez said American immigration authorities laughed, cheered and applauded.

The officials assured Rodríguez that everyone in line would make it through. But the line barely moved. And by 9 p.m., U.S. authorities at the border said no more Cubans would be allowed to cross.

Last year, some 36,000 Cubans without visas crossed into the U.S. through Laredo in southern Texas, according to Customs and Border Protection. Many simply walked across the pedestrian bridge from Mexico and presented themselves at Laredo’s legal port of entry.

Under a unique policy stemming from the 1966 Cuban Adjustment Act, Cubans were generally paroled into the U.S., even without papers, and were then allowed to apply for U.S. residency with a short path to American citizenship.

Obama’s 11th-hour policy change put an end to that, leaving an unknown number of Cubans caught in transit. Few countries allow Cubans to enter on tourist visas, so many migrants travel by air to the South American country of Guyana, and then work their way toward the U.S. by land. Others try their luck reaching the U.S. by sea, knowing they risk their lives and will be returned if caught ― the “wet foot” part of the now-abandoned wet foot-dry foot policy.

On Friday, dozens of dejected Cubans lingered at the bridge entrance, unsure where to go with their plans dashed by Obama’s surprise announcement.

Cubans once migrated to the U.S. seeking freedom from political persecution. But some have always come to the U.S. to seek a better economic future. And as the U.S. relationship with the island has changed and the Cuban economy has soured, an improved standard of living has become perhaps the biggest reason. 

Both the Obama administration and many exile-generation Cuban-Americans have criticized the old policy as antiquated. The Cuban government has long urged the U.S. to end wet foot-dry foot, arguing it encourages Cubans to risk their lives.

But those stuck in limbo described a tangle of political and economic reasons for leaving ― not unlike other Latin American migrants ― and said they feared retaliation if forced to return.

Ernesto Vázquez, 33, left Cuba two months ago with his girlfriend. They flew to Guyana, then traveled by land to Brazil, then onward through the isthmus of Panama, through Central America, and into Mexico. Along the way, they spent thousands of dollars on planes, buses and “coyotes” ― the Spanish slang for human smugglers.

They reached Nuevo Laredo one day too late.

“We’ll have to see what happens,” Vázquez told HuffPost. “This dream is dead.”

If crossing the U.S. border now seems impossible, going back to Cuba isn’t an easy option, either. Vázquez said returning Cubans have trouble getting work and face “constant persecution.” Communist Party officials, who still control most of the island’s economy, would view him as a “gusano,” or “worm” ― a derogatory term for Cubans who flee to the U.S., he said.

“Once you leave, and you return as a deportee, they treat you as if you were their enemy,” Ernesto’s girlfriend Lilian said.

Michael Bustamante, a professor at Florida International University who studies Cuba, said Cubans who leave have in the past had problems reinserting themselves into life on the island. But he said he doubted the Cuban government would demonize today’s repatriated migrants the way they did to the exile generation.

“Might there be unofficial obstacles that one faces having that status? Perhaps,” Bustamante said. “I don’t see a scarlet letter in a political sense that people will wear.”

Bustamante said economics and politics have always played intertwined roles in prompting Cubans to leave. “Even if you look back to the 1960s ― yes, people were leaving for political reasons,” Bustamante said. “But they were also leaving because they might have lost a business, they might have lost their bottom lines. Even back then, the motives have always been blurred.”

Some of the stranded Cubans said they’d stay in town for a few days, holding out a flicker of hope that the incoming president would undo Obama’s change next week.

“There’s nothing to do but hope that Trump reverses this,” Yoandris Pardo, 36, told HuffPost.

Pardo had spent the last two months in Mexico City, helping organize conferences as part of a cultural exchange. When his job duties ended, he hoped to apply for asylum. He said that he didn’t have documentation showing that he’d been persecuted politically, but that most everyday Cubans who opposed the Castro government felt afraid to do so publicly.

“We’ve always been accepted by the American government,” Pardo said.  

One couple ― a Venezuelan and a Cuban ― had traveled from Chile, where they’d lived for the last few years. But, having fled what they viewed as dysfunctional and tyrannical socialist governments, they grew anxious about the rising power of left-wing parties in Chile. They sold their house, quit their jobs, flew to Mexico City and took a 20-hour bus ride to Nuevo Laredo.

Friday morning, they stopped for breakfast on their way to the border crossing. They were shocked to hear the TV news report that U.S. immigration authorities were refusing Cubans. 

The couple ― who declined to be identified by name, citing fears of botching their immigration cases if they attempted to cross ― stood paralyzed for more than hour with their suitcases in the Plaza Juárez, just steps from the bridge. They repeatedly reviewed their options, always reaching the same conclusion: Trying to step across the border wasn’t worth it.

Finally, they walked to the bridge with a Mexican relative to ask. In front of the turnstiles, a Mexican security official told them that if they tried to cross, they’d be turned away or taken into custody. “I’m not crossing just to be detained,” the Cuban man said.

So the man and woman turned around, and headed to the relative’s house in Torreón, unsure for the moment which country was home.

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A Convincing Argument For Why Flirts Are The Best Kind Of People

People who flirt aimlessly tend to get a bad rap. After all, if you have no intention of pursuing someone, what’s the point of pouring on the charm? 

Flirting does serve a purpose, though, says philosopher Alain de Botton, and believe it or not, it’s a noble one. 

“At its best, flirting can be a vital social process that generously lends us reassurance. Flirting freely redistributes confidence and self-esteem,” the author says in a new video from his School of Life series.

“Good flirting,” he explains, “is an attempt driven by kindness and imaginative excitement to inspire another person to believe more firmly in their own likability ― psychological as much as physical.”

De Botton’s take on an “honorable version” of flirting makes sense: Think back to the last time someone shamelessly flirted with you and you flirted right back. Sure, you may roll your eyes at the thought of him or her now (”A phone number would have been nice!”), but for a moment, the light banter you shared made you feel giddy and good about yourself. 

Watch the video above to hear more on why we should all seek to become better flirts.

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How To Attend Watch Us Run: An Inauguration Day Event In Washington, D.C.

There’s no time like the present to get inspired, to get involved, and to elevate diverse voices. That’s why HuffPost and Bustle, in partnership with Bold, are turning Inauguration Day into a non-partisan platform for action. Our event is called Watch Us Run, and will take place in Washington, D.C. on Jan. 20 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

You’re all invited.

What Is “Watch Us Run?”

Watch Us Run is a non-partisan event hosted by HuffPost and Bustle, in partnership with Bold, that joins some of the most influential figures in politics, media, the arts, and activism for a day of sharing, learning, a little bit of eating and drinking, and a lot of organizing for change.

Who Will Be There?

Confirmed panelists include actor and UNFPA Global Goodwill Ambassador Ashley Judd, Oscar Award-winning filmmaker Michael Moore, actor Amber Tamblyn, former Independent presidential candidate Evan McMullin, “The Daily Show” co-creator Lizz Winstead, comedian Phoebe Robinson, Women’s March co-chair Bob Bland, Mothers of the Movement’s Lucia McBath, and HuffPost’s new Editor-in-Chief Lydia Polgreen.

And hopefully, you’ll be there, too.

When And Where Is It?

Watch Us Run will take place in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 20 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the The National Press Club, 529 14th St. NW, 13th Floor, Washington, D.C. 20045. The panels will take place in the First Amendment Lounge; auxiliary programming, and the happy hour, will take place in the Holeman Lounge.

Did You Say Happy Hour?

Sure did. In addition to our panels (more info on that under the “Day’s Schedule” section), we’ll have other gratis food, drink, and programing to keep you energized and engaged. (Watch Us Also Have Fun, if you will.) In the Holeman Lounge, there will be:

  • Snacks, lunch, and a complimentary happy hour from 3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

  • Supplies to make signs and posters for the Women’s March on Saturday

  • A phone-banking station (with script prompts!) from which you can call your representatives

  • An interactive art project where attendees can come together to symbolize a united passion for making a difference

  • A Giphy booth for fun photo opps

  • Our friends from Tattly giving you temporary tattoos

  • A pen pal program, to help you connect with women across the country, who share and don’t share your beliefs

  • Acclaimed artist Jamie Peterson, live-painting the event

  • And more!

Do I Have To Pay For Anything?

Nope! The entire day (entrance, art supplies, food, drink, everything) is free!

Can I Just Show Up?

You need to register. Security will be tight. Here’s the registration link!

Guys, you really do need to register. It only takes a couple seconds, so just click the link and register already. Then send the link to your friends. All are welcome (and that includes men, obviously); this event is family-friendly. There will also be space where mothers can pump.

Doors open at 9:00 a.m., and you can arrive or leave whenever you please.

If you can’t attend in person, attend online. We’ll be live-streaming the event from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on HuffPost Women’s Facebook account.

Transportation Recommendations, Please!

Due to security measures around D.C., please leave ample travel time. Heavy delays are expected and road closures will be in place. To get to the National Press Club using public transportation…

  • Take Metro to Metro Center.

  • Use the 13th Street Exit, take escalator to 13th Street; you should be at the corner of 13th and G Streets.

  • Walk one block south to F Street.

  • Turn right (West) and walk one block to 14th Street

  • Turn left and walk downhill to the National Press Building lobby

  • Enter and take the elevators to the 13th Floor

What Does The Day’s Schedule Look Like?

Check out our outline for the day’s events. It’s subject to change and this post will be updated when or if it does.

**Still to be scheduled: Keynote by Michael Moore; A fireside chat with Ashley Judd and Rep. Barbara Lee 

9:15 a.m: Opening Remarks 

9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m: Panel 1: Watch Us Get Elected: What Does It Take To Run For Office?

Panelists: Aisha Moodie-Mills, president and CEO, the Victory Fund and Institute; Christine Quinn, president and chief executive officer, Win; Evan McMullin, former independent presidential candidate; Erin Cutraro, Co-Founder & CEO of She Should Run;Marilinda Garcia, national spokesperson for LIBRE Initiative and former state representative, New Hampshire; and Sandra Fluke, American attorney and women’s rights activist. Moderator: Carrie Sheffield, Founder, Bold.

Panel description: The non-profit organization SheShouldRun, which focuses on helping women seek elected office, has seen a 4,000 percent increase in women joining their programs since the election. It’s especially crucial right now that women, LGBTQ individuals, and people of color gain representation in government. But how do you translate the idea of running for office into action and actually execute a campaign?

Our panel of experienced political masterminds, who have run for high-profile offices themselves — and who have been a part of campaigns focused on improving diversity in our nation’s politics — will answer questions to get you ready to run and win. Like, what the heck is an exploratory campaign? How does fundraising actually work? What should you be prepared for when thrusting yourself into the public eye?

10:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m: Break

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m: Panel 2: Watch Us Lead The Conversation: The Role Of The Media

Panelists: Panelists: Hadas Gold, media reporter at Politico; Keli Goff, columnist, The Daily Beast; Lori Leibovich, digital director of women’s content, Time Inc.; Noor Tagouri, journalist, Newsy; and Zainab Salbi, author and commentator. Moderator: Lydia Polgreen, Editor-in-Chief, HuffPost.

Panel description: After an election cycle plagued by fake news and faulty polling, trust in the mainstream media is at an all-time low. At no time in our history has the there been easier access to news, more media destinations to choose from, or more questions about the role media plays in our politics. So how do we drive the conversation forward in a fair, critical, and accurate manner?

Our panelists of journalists and commentators will discuss what it means to cover such an untraditional and deeply media-adverse president, how the media can work to reestablish trust, and how we can effectively speak to such a divided nation about the topics that matter to them.

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m: Lunch

1:15 p.m. – 2:15 p.m: Panel 3: Watch Us Get Organized: How To Build Grassroots Momentum

Panelists: Bob Bland, co-chair, Women’s March; Lizz Winstead, founder, Lady Parts Justice and co-creator of “The Daily Show”; Lucia McBath, activist, Mothers of the Movement; and Rina Shah, Republican strategist and commentator and spokeswomen, Evan McMullin’s campaign. Moderator: Julie Alvin, Executive Editor, Bustle.

Panel description: The 2016 election was unlike any other in terms of the outrage and passion it inspired in voters. The results brought out the inner activist in many of us, with people asking themselves what they could do to affect concrete change at a time when our country is so divided and the rights of marginalized people are at such great risk. Our panelists are pros at tapping into the zeitgeist and elevating voices in their communities to push towards progress.

So, at a time when the mainstream media no longer has a monopoly on what we read, watch, and listen to, what’s the best way to gain grassroots momentum? How do you get your communities excited? What tools do you use to get your message out there? What is it like to be the face of a movement?

2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m: Panel 4: Watch Us Create: What It Means To Be An Artist Now

Panelists: Erin Darke, actor, “Good Girls Revolt”; Phoebe Robinson, comedian and actor, 2 Dope Queens; Amber Tamblyn, actor; and Sophia Wallace, artist, Cliteracy. Moderator: Emma Gray, Executive Women’s Editor, HuffPost.

Panel description: Art is the highest expression of human emotion, and has long been an important tool in responding to and protesting our politicians. In the age of Trump, how can creators and artists convey our human experience with compassion and empathy? How can we use art to drive out the divisiveness of the 2016 campaign cycle?

As Carrie Fisher said, “Take your broken heart, make it into art.” Our panel of creators will discuss how they plan to use their crafts to respond to the current political climate. They’ll talk about the role of art in moving society toward a place of light, unity and transcendence.

3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m: Cocktails in the Holeman Lounge

A time to network, a time to talk, a time to toast. Awww yeah.

What Else Should I Know?

Don’t be shy about spreading the love. Our event hashtag is #WatchUsRun. A very special thanks to Bow & Drape; Millioneiress;Daisy Natives; Wildfang; Tattly; Keppler Speakers; and artist Jamie Peterson.  

See you on Friday, January 20!

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Looking For Anti-Trump Protests? Here Are Dozens To Choose From.

A man who bragged about sexually assaulting women, mocked a reporter with a disability and invited a foreign adversary to hack the U.S. government will be sworn in next Friday as the 45th president of the United States.

And while it’s a fact that President-elect Donald Trump will be the next leader of the free world ― the first one to refuse to release his taxes since 1976, by the way ― you certainly don’t have to like it.

You can voice your concern at one of the hundreds of demonstrations planned across the country and around the world in the days surrounding the inauguration.

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), along with congressional Democrats and health care activists, plans to lead dozens of rallies nationwide in an initiative called Our First Stand: Save Our Health Care. Most of the events are scheduled for this weekend, a few days before the inauguration.

Hundreds of poets are expected to gather on the steps of their local city halls on Sunday, Jan. 15, during the nationwide Poets Protest Against Trump.

Filmmaker and activist Michael Moore tweeted last month in support of the #DisruptJ20 Inauguration Day rallies planned around Washington, D.C., and Baltimore. The events are led by “a collective of experience activists” who call themselves the DC Welcoming Committee, according to the #DisruptJ20 website, which also lists numerous protests beyond the Beltway.

And, of course, the Women’s March on Washington and its more than 280 sister marches are expected to be the main event on Saturday, Jan. 21.

Nearly 600,000 people ― of all gender identities ― are expected to flood the streets of major cities across the world on Trump’s first full day in office.

For even more events, take a look at the listings below. Be sure to check which events have been issued permits, and know that your participation in non-permitted demonstrations could result in arrest. 

And if those events are a no-go, you can always participate in the national general strike by refusing to work, shop or go to school on Inauguration Day. 

However you plan to resist, stay safe ― and open-minded. Remember to listen to and respect one another. 

Now go forth and protest.

Note: This is not a comprehensive list of events. This article will be updated as more information becomes available. Check back for updates.

Arizona

Phoenix

Friday, Jan. 20

Trump Inauguration Protest

6 a.m. at Carnegie Library Park

California

Los Angeles

Saturday, Jan. 14

#NoFascistUSA

12 p.m. at Los Angeles City Hall

Friday, Jan. 20

United Against Hate

11 a.m. at Olympic and Figueroa

Palo Alto

Friday, Jan. 20

#NotOurPresident

5 p.m. at El Camino Real and Embarcadero Road

Sacramento

Friday, Jan. 20

Not My President

2 p.m. at California State Capitol

San Diego

Friday, Jan. 20

Unite and Resits #J20

10:30 a.m. at San Diego State College and Chicano Park

Protest Trump

12 p.m. at Park Boulevard and President’s Way Lawn

San Francisco

Friday, Jan. 20

Bridge Together Golden Gate

10 a.m. at the Golden Gate Bridge

Fight Racism, Defend Immigrants, San Francisco

5 p.m. at UN Plaza  

Colorado

Denver

Friday, Jan. 20

Make a Change Millennial Festival

1:30 p.m. at Denver Capitol Building

Florida

Miami

Friday, Jan. 20

Inauguration Day Protest

6 p.m. Bayfront Park Amphitheater

Orlando

Friday, Jan. 20

Inauguration Day Protest

6 p.m. Lake Eola Park

Georgia

Athens 

Friday, Jan. 20

Inauguration Night Bash for Local Abortion Access

8 p.m. at Cine Athena

Atlanta

Saturday, Jan. 21

Atlanta March for Social Justice and Women

1 p.m. at the Center for Civil and Human Rights

Hawaii

Honolulu

Friday, Jan. 20

Hawaii-J20

4 p.m. Waikiki Gateway Park

Illinois

Chicago

Sunday, Jan. 15

Earth2Trump Roadshow of Resistance Rally, Chicago

6 p.m. at Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center

Friday, Jan. 20

Chicago Trump Tower March

5 p.m. at Trump International Hotel and Tower Chicago

Louisiana

New Orleans

Friday, Jan. 20

NOLAJ20

3 p.m. at Duncan Park in City Hall Plaza

Maine

Portland

Thursday, Jan. 19

No Fascist USA

2 p.m. at Monument Park

Massachusetts

Boston

Friday, Jan. 20

Resist Trump: Occupy Inauguration Boston!

6 p.m. at Boston Common’s Parkman Bandstand

Minnesota

Minneapolis

Friday, Jan. 20

Strike Against Trump and Poverty Wages

5:30 a.m. at 1530 New Brighton Blvd.

Resist Against Trump’s Agenda

2 p.m. at Lake Street and Nicollet Ave. S

Missouri

Kansas City

Friday, Jan. 20

Kansas City Trump Inauguration Protest

2 p.m. at Union Station

Nevada

Las Vegas

Thursday, Jan. 19

Anti-Trump Inauguration Eve March

4 p.m. at Trump International Hotel Las Vegas

New York

New York City

Saturday, Jan. 14

Queens United Against Trump Rally

1 p.m. at Jamaica Colosseum Mall

Sunday, Jan. 15

Truth. Resistance. Opposition. March on Trump Tower

11:30 a.m. at 5th Avenue and 59th Street

TrumpCare Makes Us Sick!

12:30 p.m. at Trump International Hotel and Tower NYC

Writers Resist: Louder Together for Free Expression

2 p.m. at the New York Public Library

Monday, Jan. 16

Bay Ridge March Against Hate

1 p.m. at Islamic Society of Bay Ridge

Wednesday, Jan. 18

Obama Farewell & Call To Action

7 p.m. at Theater for the New City

Thursday, Jan. 19

What A Joke: A Stand Up Benefit For The ACLU

8 p.m. at The Stand 

Friday, Jan. 20

Resist Trump: Student Walk Out and Rally

5 p.m. in Foley Square, student walkouts throughout the day

Anti-Inauguration Ball

7 p.m. at DiMenna Center for Classical Music

What A Joke: A Stand Up Benefit For The ACLU

8 p.m. at Annoyance Theater

The Anti-Inauguration

8 p.m. at the Lincoln Theatre

The UNaugural Ball

9 p.m. at the Bowery Hotel

Saturday, Jan. 21

What A Joke: A Stand Up Benefit For The ACLU

7:30 p.m. at Rough Trade

Ohio

Cleveland

Saturday, Jan. 14

Anti-Trump Protest

5 p.m. at Cleveland Public Square

Oregon

Portland

Saturday, Jan. 21

United Front Against the Trump Agenda

10 a.m. at Shemanski Park

Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

Friday, Jan. 20

Resist Trump!

3 p.m. at Thomas Paine Plaza

Tennessee

Nashville

Friday, Jan. 20

Silent Inauguration

12 p.m. at Centennial Park Band Shell

Texas

Austin

Friday, Jan. 20

One Resistance, Austin

5 p.m. at Auditorium Shores

Saturday, Jan. 21

Boundless Across Borders

12 p.m. at Armijo Par

Dallas

Friday, Jan. 20

#J20 Anti-Trump March

3 p.m. at Lake Cliff Park

Saturday, Jan. 21

Women’s Rally and Mega Phone Bank

10 a.m. at CWA Local 6215 

Virginia

Fredericksburg

Sunday, Jan. 15

Silent Inauguration

12 p.m. at Hurkamp Park  

Washington

Seattle

Friday, Jan. 20

Resist Trump: Occupy Inauguration

5 p.m. at Westlake Park 

Washington, D.C.

Saturday, Jan. 14

Black Is Back Self-Determination Rally

12 p.m. at Howard University Blackburn Center Events

Sunday, Jan. 15

We Shall Not Be Moved March

9 a.m. at National Sylvan Theater

Thursday, Jan. 19

Non-Violent Protest

2 p.m. at Franklin Square Park (through Sunday, Jan. 22)

Peace Ball With CODEPINK

8 p.m. at National Museum of African American History and Culture

Friday, Jan. 20

#NotMyPresident

12 a.m. at the U.S. Capitol Building

#InaugurateTheResistance

7 a.m. at Freedom Plaza 

March on the Inauguration

10 a.m. Malcolm X Park

Rally for Humanity

10 a.m. at Martin Luther King National Memorial

Saturday, Jan. 21

Petition To End Politics Of Division

10 a.m. at World War II Memorial 

Wisconsin

Milwaukee

Friday, Jan. 20

March to Kick Off 100 Days of Resistance

5 p.m. at Red Arrow Park

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Katy Perry PSA For American Muslims Asks ‘Is History Repeating Itself?’

Confronted with an increase in hate crimes and Islamophobic rhetoric, American Muslims have been organizing, educating and speaking out.

Now, an unexpected and somewhat controversial ally is bringing awareness to the fight that America’s Muslims are facing over the next four years ― pop star Katy Perry.

On Wednesday, a PSA that Perry executive produced appeared on YouTube. Given the haunting title, “Is History Repeating Itself?” the video draws parallels between the rhetoric that caused the mass incarceration of Japanese Americans and the fear-mongering political rhetoric that is attacking American Muslims today.  

Is history repeating itself…?#DONTNORMALIZEHATE https://t.co/ngG11quhmK

— KATY PERRY (@katyperry) January 12, 2017

During World War II, about 120,000 Japanese American citizens were forced by executive order to leave their homes and businesses and live behind barbed wires in internment camps. This flagrant violation of civil rights was caused by fear ― after the Pearl Harbor attacks, the U.S. War Department and some of the nation’s political leaders became suspicious that Japanese Americans might try to sabotage the war effort, even though they had no hard evidence to prove it.

On March 31, 1942, Japanese Americans who lived on the West Coast were ordered to report their names in a registry, and soon after, forced to evacuate their homes.

According to the Los Angeles Times, Perry’s video tells the true story of Haru Kuromiya, an American woman with Japanese heritage whose life was changed forever by the camps. 

“We were an American farm family now living in an interment camp and our constitutional rights were taken away from us,” an actress playing Kuromiya said in the video. “It all started with fear and rumors then it bloomed into the registration of Japanese Americans and then labeling with physical tags and then eventually internment.”  

At the end of the video, the actress playing Kuromiya takes off her mask to reveal the face of Hina Khan, a Muslim actress of Pakistani heritage. 

Watch the reveal below.

Aya Tanimura, a filmmaker of Japanese and Australian descent, co-directed the film. She told The Huffington Post that it’s Kuromiya who agreed to record the story in her own voice for the video. Casting an authentic figure from that troubled time in America’s history, and casting a real Muslim American woman were both “non-negotiable” for the film’s creators.

“The PSA is a cautionary story of the damage fear-mongering can do,” Tanimura told HuffPost in an email. “We hope that it reminds everyone that segregating and dividing each other further than we already are will only lead to more fear and violence.”

The video ends with the words, “A Muslim registry is the first step in repeating history. Don’t turn against each other out of fear. #DontNormalizeHate.” 

President-elect Donald Trump made Islamophobic rhetoric a core part of his campaign for the White House. He proposed banning Muslims from entering the country, then backtracked by saying it had “morphed” into an “extreme vetting” of immigrants. He’s refused to openly condemn to the idea of a establishing a registry for Muslims already in the country.

Tanimura told the Los Angeles Times that Trump has “created an atmosphere of fear for Muslim Americans in the United States.”

“The accountability and responsibility for what you say and do now has been lifted so people feel a little freer to be racist, or act upon racism, because there are not necessarily consequences for it — it’s just acceptable behavior,” she said. “If laws are put in place to back that up, it will be pretty scary.”

On January 21, Perry is slated to join in a much-anticipated women’s march on Washington to oppose Trump’s inauguration. But her legacy isn’t without controversy.

Perry has been criticized in the past for appropriating from Asian culture. She was criticized in 2013 for a performance at the American Music Awards where she appeared to be stereotyping Japanese culture. And in 2014, her music video for “Dark Horse” was edited after it caused offense to some Muslims. In it, a man wearing an pendant with the word “Allah” in Arabic was struck by lightening and burned.

However, Tanimura was appreciative of her contributions to this film. Perry reportedly paid for the costs of the prosthetics designed for the video. 

Tanimura said of Perry,  “I think like a lot of us who are terrified of Trump’s ideals and policies, she is too. And this is one instance where she’s able to help educate someone — even one person — on the horrors of the past and what could potentially be repeated.” 

UPDATE: This article was updated with comments and information from the film’s co-director Aya Tanimura.

 

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Katy Perry PSA For American Muslims Asks ‘Is History Repeating Itself?’

Confronted with an increase in hate crimes and Islamophobic rhetoric, American Muslims have been organizing, educating and speaking out.

Now, an unexpected and somewhat controversial ally is bringing awareness to the fight that America’s Muslims are facing over the next four years ― pop star Katy Perry.

On Wednesday, a PSA that Perry executive produced appeared on YouTube. Given the haunting title, “Is History Repeating Itself?” the video draws parallels between the rhetoric that caused the mass incarceration of Japanese Americans and the fear-mongering political rhetoric that is attacking American Muslims today.  

Is history repeating itself…?#DONTNORMALIZEHATE https://t.co/ngG11quhmK

— KATY PERRY (@katyperry) January 12, 2017

During World War II, about 120,000 Japanese American citizens were forced by executive order to leave their homes and businesses and live behind barbed wires in internment camps. This flagrant violation of civil rights was caused by fear ― after the Pearl Harbor attacks, the U.S. War Department and some of the nation’s political leaders became suspicious that Japanese Americans might try to sabotage the war effort, even though they had no hard evidence to prove it.

On March 31, 1942, Japanese Americans who lived on the West Coast were ordered to report their names in a registry, and soon after, forced to evacuate their homes.

According to the Los Angeles Times, Perry’s video tells the true story of Haru Kuromiya, an American woman with Japanese heritage whose life was changed forever by the camps. 

“We were an American farm family now living in an interment camp and our constitutional rights were taken away from us,” an actress playing Kuromiya said in the video. “It all started with fear and rumors then it bloomed into the registration of Japanese Americans and then labeling with physical tags and then eventually internment.”  

At the end of the video, the actress playing Kuromiya takes off her mask to reveal the face of Hina Khan, a Muslim actress of Pakistani heritage. 

Watch the reveal below.

Aya Tanimura, a filmmaker of Japanese and Australian descent, co-directed the film. She told The Huffington Post that it’s Kuromiya who agreed to record the story in her own voice for the video. Casting an authentic figure from that troubled time in America’s history, and casting a real Muslim American woman were both “non-negotiable” for the film’s creators.

“The PSA is a cautionary story of the damage fear-mongering can do,” Tanimura told HuffPost in an email. “We hope that it reminds everyone that segregating and dividing each other further than we already are will only lead to more fear and violence.”

The video ends with the words, “A Muslim registry is the first step in repeating history. Don’t turn against each other out of fear. #DontNormalizeHate.” 

President-elect Donald Trump made Islamophobic rhetoric a core part of his campaign for the White House. He proposed banning Muslims from entering the country, then backtracked by saying it had “morphed” into an “extreme vetting” of immigrants. He’s refused to openly condemn to the idea of a establishing a registry for Muslims already in the country.

Tanimura told the Los Angeles Times that Trump has “created an atmosphere of fear for Muslim Americans in the United States.”

“The accountability and responsibility for what you say and do now has been lifted so people feel a little freer to be racist, or act upon racism, because there are not necessarily consequences for it — it’s just acceptable behavior,” she said. “If laws are put in place to back that up, it will be pretty scary.”

On January 21, Perry is slated to join in a much-anticipated women’s march on Washington to oppose Trump’s inauguration. But her legacy isn’t without controversy.

Perry has been criticized in the past for appropriating from Asian culture. She was criticized in 2013 for a performance at the American Music Awards where she appeared to be stereotyping Japanese culture. And in 2014, her music video for “Dark Horse” was edited after it caused offense to some Muslims. In it, a man wearing an pendant with the word “Allah” in Arabic was struck by lightening and burned.

However, Tanimura was appreciative of her contributions to this film. Perry reportedly paid for the costs of the prosthetics designed for the video. 

Tanimura said of Perry,  “I think like a lot of us who are terrified of Trump’s ideals and policies, she is too. And this is one instance where she’s able to help educate someone — even one person — on the horrors of the past and what could potentially be repeated.” 

UPDATE: This article was updated with comments and information from the film’s co-director Aya Tanimura.

 

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Oh God, The Ending Of ‘Shawshank Redemption,’ But With Obama And Biden

The bromance between President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden has built itself into quite a legend, highlighted particularly in the remaining days of this administration.

The president singled out Joe in his farewell speech, praising Biden as a brother. And Biden had nothing but warm sentiments for the president after Obama presented him with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Welp, edit wizard Todd Spence took this bromance to the natural next level, adding Joe Biden and Barack Obama to the end of “The Shawshank Redemption.” Definitely more satisfying than reality.

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

The 20 Funniest Tweets From Women This Week

The ladies of Twitter never fail to brighten our days with their brilliant ― but succinct ― wisdom. Each week, HuffPost Women rounds up hilarious 140-character musings. For this week’s great tweets from women, scroll through the list below. Then visit our Funniest Tweets From Women page for our past collections.       

My personal brand is resting my boobs on the table when I get tired of holding them up.

— Akilah Hughes (@AkilahObviously) January 13, 2017

I killed a huge spider in my room and googled if it was dangerous. Found out the females eat males after mating & now I regret killing it

— Ali V. (@alivingiano) January 8, 2017

whenever i get the walk signal at an intersection, i think "now it's MY time to shine!"

— Aparna Nancherla (@aparnapkin) January 8, 2017

Good news white dudes! You can harass women all you want and still a) be president and b) win prestigious Hollywood movie awards yaaaaay

— Jenavieve Hatch (@jenavievehatch) January 9, 2017

maybe all the men should be banned from twitter, just until we can figure out what is going on.

— Emoji User (@fifthstarter) January 8, 2017

When you get ready to block a troll but they only have 20 followers pic.twitter.com/z3NYn30uOV

— Ijeoma Oluo (@IjeomaOluo) January 8, 2017

the only thing that'll make me feel better right now is a shirt with michelle obama's face on it

— Rachel Charlene (@RachelCharleneL) January 11, 2017

senator: would you oppose THING
sessions: it sounds complicated and i didn't prepare
senator: it's literally illegal
sessions: what's a law

— Alexandra Petri (@petridishes) January 10, 2017

anybody need one im printing a poster size for 2017 pic.twitter.com/U41QZokH0e

— Julia Bush (@jabush) January 11, 2017

My boyfriend to me during Obama's farewell address: "I want you to look at me the way Biden looks at Obama." #goals

— Tanisha L. Ramirez (@TanishaLove) January 11, 2017

crying, eating a grilled cheese but still kinda dancing to J.Lo's "Waiting For Tonight" bc my period, mood disorder & Obama all showed up tn

— Lauren Zupkus (@laurenzup) January 11, 2017

me: *walks into my house*
my mom: take out the trash
me: pic.twitter.com/0CDGZ9PJ9L

— Lourdes (@gossipgriII) January 11, 2017

Fuck flowers. Romance is premaking coffee the night before.

— Emily McCombs (@msemilymccombs) January 12, 2017

"Always ten followers away from 3000" it read on her tombstone

— Katina Corrao (@KatinaCorrao) January 12, 2017

THE REPUBLICANS WANT TO TAKE AWAY MY BIRTH CONTROL BUT THAT'S ONLY GOING TO MAKE MORE DEMOCRATS

— Yael (@elle91) January 12, 2017

If 2017 brings us a UFC fight between Meryl Streep and Donald Trump, then it will all have been worth it

— Heben Nigatu (@heavenrants) January 9, 2017

"Respond whore" is not a good way to get me to respond, but it is how I think of myself in third person when composing emails

— Lauren Duca (@laurenduca) January 13, 2017

Not to brag, but I have been referred to as "exhausting."

— Darla (@ddsmidt) January 10, 2017

My Roomba Is Trying To Kill Me: The Musical

— Lynn G (@illiter8too) January 10, 2017

*moves $124 to an offshore bank account*

— heather lou* (@heatherlou_) January 12, 2017

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

A Guy Asked This Woman To Send Nudes. You’ll Want To Steal Her Reply

One woman is serving up a masterclass in how to respond to “send nudes” requests. 

On Tuesday, Monconjay Brown, a 25-year-old living in China, posted the hilarious response she sent to a guy on OKCupid when he asked for naked photos.

“Some a*shole online kept hammering me for nudes,” she wrote on Imgur. “He got what he asked for ;)”

He sure did:

Unsurprisingly, the guy chickened out of the convo after that. 

Brown, who hails from the East Coast, told The Huffington Post she enjoys trolling creepers like the guy above every now and then.

”I’m not some kind of caped Internet wanderer that searches the web for victims to troll, but usually, if I’m in the mood and the guy is pestering me enough, then I’ll troll him,” she said. “I’ve done this to several dates. I’m really immature.”  

More like whip-smart. May we all be so immature and clever when dealing with requests for boob shots. 

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