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Hispanic Venture Capital News

Hispanic Venture Capital – At Venturuso we cover the economic power of the Hispanic entrepreneur.  Venturuso is the voice of Hispanic venture capital in the U.S.
Our mission: Bring together research insight, data, and hands on experience to be a sounding voice for entrepreneurs growing startups and existing businesses covering Hispanic venture capital news,  projects and analysis.

Understanding – We know the Hispanic demographic and the business issues.

Capabilities – we can bring data and tools to help.

Experience – we help deliver visibility and insight on your business projects.

Venturuso addresses the specific needs of Hispanics needing news and promotion of fundraising, venture capital and equity deals.

We seek out extensive research on news and deals for the Hispanic markets.

We employ seasoned business consultants and work with professionals in the Hispanic venture capital industry.

What I Learned From the Hispanic Community About Entrepreneurship

October 27, 2014 6 min read
Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.
As a Mexican-American who has followed the recent celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, I am very proud of my culture. The Hispanic community has a certain passion that transcends its component cultures and draws in others. The vibrancy of Hispanic cultures’ style, music and food has influenced the look and feel of America. This passion is also evident in the way many Hispanics do business and the opportunities that they create. 
Since 2007, Hispanics have been starting and growing businesses at more than twice the national rate. More than 3.2 million Hispanic-owned businesses will collectively contribute over $486 billion this year to the U.S. economy. While the population growth of Latinos is widely acknowledged, its business contribution to the American economy is often overlooked. 
Also overlooked are the lessons that Hispanic entrepreneurs can teach the broader business community. Because Hispanic entrepreneurs incorporate many aspects of their culture in their professional careers, they have a unique perspective on business and opportunity, making them an ideal demographic for creating new wealth. Below, I’ve outlined a few of the key characteristics of my culture and teachings to which I owe my own personal success.     
Related: Immigrants Can Shed Fears of Entering the Startup World — With These Strategies
1. Don’t stop at “no thanks.” 
Any entrepreneur will say persistence is a requirement for success and it has been embraced by many members of the Hispanic community to that end. While societal undertones are changing in places across the country, many Hispanics have dealt with adversity and challenges. When confronted with rejection, I and other Hispanics I know have not shied away from forging ahead to create a path.
When there are no “help wanted” signs or employment applications go unanswered, Hispanics stand on the street and offer their brawn to bring home the bacon to feed the family. 
Instead of waiting for opportunities to be offered, I have operated on the principle that opportunities must be made for one’s self.   
I immigrated to the States as a youngster and grew up in a central California labor camp and although the conditions were less than advantageous for members of my family, our work ethic and pride in our work led us to go beyond the expectations that others might have had for us. Many others are going through similar transitions and will drive the U.S. economy going forward. 
Despite economic challenges, poorly equipped schools and parents who worked hard but lacked academic preparation, my siblings and many peers found a way to achieve a measure of success. The realities of stratification combined with a work ethic honed by hard labor in fields and the packing sheds had a way of driving us towards success. A popular Mexican saying goes, “no te rajes,” which means “don’t back down” from a challenge.  
On a personal level, know yourself. I knew early on that I needed to be my own boss. But being successful took a great deal of preparation and willingness to take risk. I left Silicon Valley in 1995 with a meager bank account and a dream despite the plethora of opportunities there that I didn’t even bother to explore. Entrepreneurship was my way forward.
As President Calvin Coolidge said, “Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not: nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education [by itself] will not: the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent.” 
Related: How Six Immigrant Entrepreneurs Transformed Dreams Into Businesses
2. Make your own network.

Hispanics call upon friends and family to develop business opportunities. Yet many Hispanics are first- or second-generation immigrants to the United States. As relatively new arrivals, they aren’t as likely to have broad existing family, friend or professional networks available to leverage when searching for jobs or selecting careers. Because they don’t have a foundation that’s been built up for decades, they must actively look for new connections and opportunities.
Other entrepreneurs can learn from this by being willing to move beyond their comfort zones and broaden their networks to places where opportunities can be found. Never stop making connections with the people who can advance a career. These ties are often the most challenging to make but the most rewarding.
When outnumbered and feeling unlike their peers — still the case for many Hispanics in Silicon Valley  — Latinos need to reach out and create personal connections within and across cultures. This requires breaking out of your shell and being more open and self-confident that you have something unique to offer.
Knowing that you’ve got a unique and valuable perspective — whether in a peer-to-peer discussion or when developing a business plan — this is the seed of entrepreneurship. 
Related: What Needs to Happen for More Women, Minorities to Get Into Computer Science
3. Embrace technology.  
Modern technology has opened the door for anyone to become an entrepreneur, depending on the quality of the idea and gumption to run with it. Now that the world has become an economy of ideas, those who leverage technology to their advantage can succeed despite a lack of traditional resources. Crowdfunding sites have overcome the challenge of capital, mobility has evaded concerns about location and social media has circumvented the issue of awareness and helped level the playing field.
Indeed studies have shown that Hispanic Americans are very active on social media channels. According to the Pew Research Center’s Internet Project, “80% of U.S. Hispanic adults use social media, compared to 72% for the country overall.” 
Never stop looking for opportunities to engage with others and equip your personal and professional brands accordingly to seize opportunity.  
The Hispanic community is becoming increasingly visible across America’s professional and economic landscape. As American society continues to diversify, the lessons of one group can apply to all groups. By understanding and learning from Hispanic experiences, members of the greater business community can emulate this success and capitalize on it. Americans can learn values and lessons from all communities to be collectively successful.
Related: 5 Lessons Entrepreneurs Can Learn From Oscar de la Renta

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4 Successful Ways Businesses Need to Adapt to a Growing Hispanic Demographic

Make sure your brand and message is inclusive.
July 6, 2018 4 min read
Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.
According to Geoscape, by 2020, over 50.6 percent of the U.S. population growth will be attributed to the Hispanic market.
Small and large corporations alike will be affected by this demographic shift, now and well into the future. Multicultural consumers are driving the growth of the U.S. economy, its employment growth and even upcoming political elections.
As the U.S. Hispanic community matures and becomes part of the mainstream, their household incomes increase and so does their economic class. The projected growth of Hispanic household incomes of $100k+ between 2017–2022 will be +23 vs. +12 percent for non-Hispanics, based on a Geoscape report.
Consumers do not buy products or services; they buy brand experiences. It starts from the first time they visit your website, walk inside your store or even interact with your customer service hotline. You have to be able to fulfill your customers’ needs, wants and desires so you can build loyalty, increase retention and turn them into your brand ambassadors.
Here are four helpful tips to gain a new profitable consumer base with Hispanics.
Related: 10 Reasons Why Good Customer Service Is Your Most Important Metric
1. Invest in research. 
Throughout my career, I have encountered many occasions when corporations did not know their Hispanic customer base. They didn’t know what percentage they represented, where they were located, what they bought from them, etc.
So, if the upcoming consumer growth will be multicultural, and in particular Hispanics, how can you project revenue growth in your company when you don’t know who your customers truly are or whether you are fulfilling their needs?
Qualitative and quantitative researches are the wisest investment you can make.
Related: Steal These 4 Proven Customer-Retention Strategies
2. Be proactive.
I have seen executives who get paralyzed with the decision of moving forward with a Hispanic market initiative. They make excuses such as, “I don’t have a budget for this market, it is not a priority as we are content at the present time.” Or they say, “Once we hire bilingual employees with a customer service hotline and we convert our marketing materials in multiple languages, then we will start thinking about marketing to Hispanics. ”
As Zig Zigler said, “If you wait until all the lights are green before you leave home, you’ll never get started on your trip to the top.”
You have to start somewhere. Reallocate a portion of your marketing budget to Hispanics. You will obtain a greater ROI.
3. Culture is more important than language. 
The growth of the Hispanic market will come from those born in the USA, bilingual, bi-culture, higher household income, higher level of education.
For many corporations, a Hispanic initiative means targeting to the traditional Spanish-speaking consumers through a partnership with a Hispanic network running translated messages or scripts into Spanish.
But, what about millennials and Generation Z? Diversity youthful is becoming the counterweight of white aging consumers. This is why cultural relevancy is key to engaging with Hispanics. It is not about language, it is about culture and how well you understand it.
English might be their preferred language, but your execution has to appeal to their cultural nuances.
Related: 25 Tips for Earning Customer Loyalty
4. Be inclusive.
You have to have the right diversity representation in your business. If you are in an area where, for example, 20 percent of the people living within a five- to 10-mile radius from your store are Hispanic, what makes you think that you don’t need bilingual people on your team?
You must hire accordingly, it will pay off in the long run. I remember talking with a car dealer in Miami who reached out to us because sales where declining for him.
Turns out, his marketing money was only allocated to the Anglo market. Basically, he was only reaching 30 percent of the Miami-Ft. Lauderdale DMA consumer market. That was a big part of his problem.
So, if you really want to be successful with Hispanic consumers, the best investment you can make is in education. Learn who they are, get exposed to their culture and how they interact with your brand.
Start investing in this market today, so you can assure a sustainable growth for your business now and well into the future.

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6 Reasons Corporate America Misses Out on Trillions of Hispanic Dollars

How businesses can target one of the fastest-growing markets in America.
June 1, 2017 6 min read
Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.
America is changing and becoming more multicultural. A big part of that has been due to the Hispanic market. They are not just a sub-segment of our economy anymore. They have become a powerhouse of economic and political influence. Their purchasing power of over $1.5 trillion is larger than the GDP of Mexico, which is considered one of the top 10 economies in the world.
If corporate America wants to strive for business success, it is time to reevaluate our marketing budgets and efforts to cater to this flourishing market.
Many times the excuse I receive from marketing executives for not addressing this market is that they do not have a budget for a separate Hispanic market initiative, or their current budget is not big enough to justify an ongoing investment.
Related: Free Marketing Tools Every Entrepreneur Can Use
Just because your company may not be performing well in the general market doesn’t mean you can’t excel in the Hispanic market.
If you want your business to succeed and attain a steady growth in the years to come, you must reallocate your marketing budget to areas or markets you haven’t reached before. Consumers are becoming more diverse and multicultural. This means your marketing approach needs to do the same. You must engage with consumers in more meaningful and culturally relevant way if you want to truly connect with them.
According to the report from Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream, minorities will constitute 80 percent of U.S. population growth between 2015 and 2020. Hispanics will represent 50.6 percent of that figure.
What does this translate to you?
Some marketing executives think it means more work on top of what they already have. That way of thinking is costing millions of dollars in lost revenue because their marketing departments are not responding to current market trends or to their consumer’s demands. All thoughts of initiating a Hispanic marketing approach are swept under the rug.
Related: The 5 Biggest Influencer Marketing Myths That Won’t Die
For others, it translates to opportunities to sell more product or services. To set themselves apart from their competitors and in many cases, to become a leader and pioneer in their industry by embracing a market that is one of the fastest-growing demographics in the USA.
The new America is not just a one-color nation requiring one marketing approach for everyone. We are a melting pot of different colors, nationalities, and cultures. Just look at the free market research or articles in major publications on the Internet. They will give you a sense and a macro point of view of how industries and markets are evolving. Instead of excluding and isolating, we must include and embrace if we really want sales growth and success in any organization.
Here are 6 reasons why corporate America falls short with their Hispanic market approach:
They don’t understand their audience. In the corporate world, there is still a misconception that since the growth of the Hispanic market comes from U.S.-born Hispanics they are culturally assimilating to the American way. So executives think their “one strategy, one message, one language” approach is good enough to reach this market. This is absolutely false. The more acculturated Hispanics are, the use of English language in your messaging is appropriate. However, whether you use English or Spanish, your execution must reflect their culture, heritage, and needs to assure brand engagement.
Cultural relevancy is key. Whether they are U.S. born or foreign born, Hispanics don’t want to be sold. They want brands to embrace their cultural relevancy. So, your campaigns have to be created for and targeted to them with messages that truly speak to their needs. Only then will you achieve the level of brand engagement that generates greater return on investment and delivers the results you want. Whether you use English or Spanish, it must be culturally relevant.
Testing the waters. Many companies tend to test the waters first instead of embracing the effort and getting a real taste of what this audience can deliver to their bottom-line. It is good to start slow, but you need to be committed to an ongoing effort. If you are running an ad campaign for a couple of weeks in different Hispanic media to see who you are getting more responses from, you are basically throwing your money away. You have to be consistent if you truly want to penetrate this market the same way you are doing for the general market. Allocate a reasonable budget by carving your general marketing budget. Build and develop a strong foundation and you will have an ongoing revenue source.
Translations vs Trans-creations. Translations could work for specific things such as a simple collateral piece or product label, for example. However, a straight translation lacks cultural relevancy. If you are translating a message that has been created for the general market, not Hispanics, you are falling short with your execution and approach. The most effective way to engage with Hispanics is by the “trans-creation” of the campaign. This means, create a campaign message that appeals to Hispanic core values, yet still respects the overall strategy and branding position from the general market campaign.
Supporting the community is not good enough. For some companies, community outreach is their overall Hispanic market effort for they year–whether they sponsor some Hispanic events or become a partner of a Hispanic non-profit organization by paying an annual trustee membership. In many cases, executives think that because of the mission of these non-profit organizations, they are reaching their customers in those specific DMAs across the nation. This is not necessarily true. It is important to sponsor events and support these organizations. However, community outreach should act as a support of your ongoing Hispanic marketing efforts, not as your annual Hispanic initiative. If you look at your overall Hispanic market DMA and you compare it with the amount of members of these non-profit organizations, you will realize that you are only reaching to a small percentage of your audience, not your overall target audience.
Getting the right help. Having a strong consultant or Hispanic marketing firm that understands Hispanic culture is key to your success. They will bring smart, effective solutions to help you engage and genuinely connect with this market. Having people on your team who speak Spanish does not necessarily mean they know how to connect with this audience. I have seen the frustration of many chief marketing officers who were using their own Hispanic employees to translate their marketing materials and it was not producing good results. Plus, they had many errors throughout their marketing materials. Cutting corners will hurt your business and your end result.
The success of a business will be defined by how well companies market their products and services to all groups, not just “the general market.” It will also depend on how open-minded executives are to reacting to market challenges and trends.
It is estimated that by 2020 the Hispanic purchasing power will reach $1.7 trillion. The question you need to ask yourself is: how much revenue are you leaving on the table by not engaging with this influential audience?

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3 Ways Your Small Business Can Pivot Toward Focusing More on Hispanic Consumers

Attracting Hispanic customers can prove a huge boon for your small business moving forward.
May 10, 2019 4 min read
Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.
It is estimated that by 2021 more than 50 percent of the U.S. population growth will be attributed to Hispanics based on a report from Geoscape American Marketscape DataStream. Today, youthful diversity is becoming the counterweight to white, aging consumers, and it is forcing brands to redefine themselves — to discover new market opportunities and develop more meaningful, culturally relevant customer experiences. 
We live in a reactive society, not a proactive one, and Corporate America moves slowly. Sometimes, the procedures that companies have in place don’t allow them to react fast enough to market trends. It’s like the old motto that many executives cling to: “If it is not broken why fix it?”
They think that if consumers want their products or services, they will buy them, and if not then so be it.
That outdated thinking won’t be sustainable moving forward, and it doesn’t have to be thanks to technology that has helped brands communicate to consumers. I remember in early 2000, many marketing executives didn’t believe in the power of digital and social media. Back then, I was participating in marketing meetings where executives had strong opinions about this new technology because it was challenging their status quo. I heard comments like, “This type of technology will never take off” and “I will never invest marketing dollars in it.” 
Now, many corporations are allocating between 40 to 60 percent of their marketing budget to digital and social media. 
That disruption a decade ago is similar to the one Hispanic consumers can create now. They are a big player and influencer in the marketplace. Yet, in the face of such a dynamic shift, I still encounter business owners who say the Hispanic market is not a top priority. They think they are already reaching Hispanic consumers through their one-size-fits-all, total market approach.
But today’s consumers are more diverse, demanding, and product savvy, and they have high expectations. So, let me share with you 3 helpful tips that will help you find a significant business opportunity with Hispanic consumers:
Be a leader. John Maxwell said, “A leader is one who knows the way, goes the way and shows the way.” Eliminate the fluff about diversity and inclusion in your vision and mission statements, and set a high bar that others in your industry will have to compete with. 
Calculate the cost of opportunity. Stop thinking about how much it is going to cost you and start thinking about the money you are leaving on the table by not tapping into a growing and influential consumer base.
Make a lasting impression. Dale Carnegie, in his book How to Win Friends and Influence People in the Digital Age, said, “To influence others to act, you must first connect to a core desire within them.” This is why cultural relevancy is key to engaging with multicultural mainstream. Stay away from a total market approach and literal translations. That won’t get you the results you are looking for.
How to improve your company’s standing with Hispanics
Start by realizing that even the idea of “Hispanics” is overly broad. Just as British and American cultures are not the same even though they speak English, what makes you think that Hispanics are all the same?
Take time to learn about your consumers and how you can influence them. Remember that consumers will decide when and how to interact with your brand and do business with you.
It’s not about what you want anymore. It’s about them.

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As millions of COVID-19 vaccines are administered each day and we begin to imagine a “new normal,” the need for bold approaches to health is greater than ever. In that pursuit, Aspen Ideas: Health will take place this year in an all-new digital format. From April...

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Venturuso brings together research insight, data, and hands on experience to bring sound advice and analysis to Hispanic venture capital news and projects.

Understanding – We know the Hispanic demographic and the business issues.

Capabilities – we can bring data and tools to help.

Experience – we help deliver visibility and insight on your business projects.

  • Venturuso address the specific needs of minority and Hispanics needing news and promotion of fundraising, venture capital and equity deals
  • We seek out extensive research on news and deals for the Hispanic markets.
  • We employ seasoned business consultants